Resources to Help Parents Advocate for Their Child in School

By: - September 17, 2011

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Adopted and foster children have unique histories and, as a result, they also have unique needs when it comes to school. Tapestry recently hosted an event, Back to School: Strategies to Help Your Child Have a Positive School Experience, which focused on school-related issues from an adoptive and foster families’ perspective. 

Below is the list of resources that was provided to parents to help them learn and understand how to advocate well for their children in school. You can also download the slides from this event here.

Books:

Articles:

Websites:

  • The Out-of-Sync Child (http://out-of-sync-child.com/) — provides articles and resources from Carol Kranowitz (author of The Out-of-Sync Child) relating to sensory processing
  • Advocacy, Inc. (http://www.advocacyinc.org/education.cfm) — provides information on advocacy, law and understanding policy associated with special populations
  • Texas Project First (www.texasprojectfirst.org) — a website of the Texas Education Agency that provides a wide range of information and resources (organized by type of need and age of student) for parents of students with disabilities. This site provides detailed information regarding the rights of Texas families to special education and related services and provides step-by-step help for obtaining that help.
  • Wrightslaw (http://www.wrightslaw.com/) — provides detailed information (and other helpful links) relating to special education law, education law, and advocacy for children with disabilities
  • Adoptive Families Magazine: Adoption & Schools (http://www.adoptivefamilies.com/school/index.php) — provides a variety of articles and links for parents and educators offering inspiring ideas for adoption presentations and creative approaches to the family tree assignment, advice from experts about development and learning styles, suggested books and more

Also Found In: Books etc., Challenges & Issues, Resources for Families, School Issues, Tapestry Blog

1 Comment